FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:How can I get the best from my ceramic harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Silver Bullet ceramic high-z harmonica microphone

The microphone is unbalanced and high impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as “passive” (typically used for acoustic pick-ups).

Using a low impedance output will diminish volume performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amplifier.

Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens turn increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.

Q: How can I get the best from my dynamic low-z harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Silverfish Dynamic Low-Z harmonica microphone

• The microphone is unbalanced and low impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a medium/high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as passive.
• Poorly matched impedance may diminish the volume and performance of the mic and therefore require an impedance conversion (low to high) as it is important to drive equipment with a source microphone signal that is lower in impedance than the destination amp’s input impedance (e.g. an amp input impedance of at least 10 times the amount of the source mic impedance).
• Depending on your rig the use of an impedance conversion is recommended for maximising output and significantly boosting the power output of this microphone (and releases the beast in this mic). For example, using a Shure A85F “low to high impedance microphone-matching transformer” will provide an additional 24 dB of signal gain. Note that this will also require a mono (female) to XLR (male) converter plug to link to your microphone lead and couple (line 1 and 3 to earth) to the in-line transformer. You should be getting a strong sweet sound from your microphone so if you are having signal strength issues the first thing you should do is transform the impedance (low to high). A pre-amp is another alternative for additional signal modification – but with added risk of introducing noise to the line.
• Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.
• Using a right angle jack plug for the harmonica mic is a great idea and works well with the rig.
• Your mic is a precision item of equipment so avoid dropping and use the protective case.
• Please do not attempt to disassemble/ open the microphone. This will damage the components and negate your warranty.

Q:How can I get the best from my dynamic low-z harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Silverfish Dynamic Medium-Z harmonica microphone

• The microphone is unbalanced and medium impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a medium/high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as passive.
• Poorly matched impedance may diminish the volume and performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amp or impedance converter as it is important to drive equipment with a source microphone signal that is lower in impedance than the destination amp’s input impedance (e.g. an amp input impedance of at least 10 times the amount of the source mic impedance).
• Depending on your rig the use of an impedance conversion is recommended for maximising output and significantly boosting the power output of this microphone (and releases the beast in this mic). For example, using a Shure A85F “low to high impedance microphone-matching transformer” will provide an additional 24 dB of signal gain. Note that this will also require a mono (female) to XLR (male) converter plug to link to your microphone lead and couple (line 1 and 3 to earth) to the in-line transformer. You should be getting a strong sweet sound from your microphone so if you are having signal strength issues the first thing you should do is transform the impedance (to high). A pre-amp is another alternative for additional signal modification – but with added risk of introducing noise to the line.
• With impedance conversion to high-z – use gain control to find your sweet spot with rig/amp settings you establish at sound-check. This is to avoid worrying about transient peeks causing clipping distortion. If you like crunch distortion – it also allows you to move the gain above head room to achieve a crunchier sound when used with a touch or reverb.
• Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.
• Using a right-angle jack plug for the harmonica mic is a great idea and works well with the rig.
• Your mic is a precision item of equipment so avoid dropping and use the protective case.

Q:How can I get the best from my switchable dynamic low/medium to high-z harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Dynamic Low/Medium to High-Z switchable impedance microphone

These microphones (with volume control) integrate a impedance transformer allowing toggle switching between low (<100 ohm) or medium 400 ohm to a high-Z 40K ohm impedance; depending on the model of mic. This greatly increases the power of the microphone (by approx. 20-25dB) and provide you with the flexibility of optimising the output and sound quality of your mic without the need for a line matching transformer. Coupled with a gain control the allows you to find the “sweet spot” at high-z with any particular rig / sound settings or at sound check. This is to avoid worrying about transient peeks causing clipping distortion. Alternatively the boost in power enables you to use higher gain at the margins of the microphones head room to achieve a crunchier, distorted sound that can be optimised with a touch or reverb.

The tiny toggle switch and gain knob enable you to take control of the microphones performance and get the most of your rig for amplified harmonica playing.

Q: Maintaining the Silverfish Bullets: Poker-chip fascia
A: To maintain the shine of the exposed metal parts of the poker-chip by periodically wiping the outer edge and inner rim (sparingly) with mineral or cooking oil – especially before prolonged storage or after extended use.

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