FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:How can I get the best from my ceramic harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Silverfish ceramic harmonica microphone

The microphone is unbalanced and high impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as “passive” (typically used for acoustic pick-ups).

Using a low impedance output will diminish volume performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amp or impedance converter.

Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens turn increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.

Q:How can I get the best from my dynamic harmonica microphone?

A:To get the best out of your Silverfish dynamic harmonica microphone

The microphone is unbalanced and low impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a medium/high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as passive (typically used for acoustic pick-ups) However – it is recommended that you experiment with using all your amps jack-inputs to achieve the best performance for your rig as all rigs are different.

Poorly matched impedance may diminish the volume and performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amp or impedance converter. The low impedance element has a relatively gently signal that rewards you with a lovely rich, fat tone. Properly amplified this element provides an amazing sound straight out of the box – perfect for practice or gigging.

Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens turn increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.

Please note

Using a right angle jack plug for the harmonica mic is a great idea and works well with the rig.

Your mic is a precision item of equipment so avoid dropping and use the protective case.

Please do not attempt to disassemble/ open the microphone. This will damage the components and negate your warranty.

Q: Where can I here a sound sample of a silverfish harmonica mic?

A: Check out a sound sample and review of the Silverfish by harmonica player and teacher Tomlin Leckie (of Strollers Music School) – he also plays some cool blues harmonica riffs on a silverfish harp microphone.

Click here for Silverfish Harp Mic_Sound Sample by Tomlin

or here: Silverfish Review_2

Click here to read the blog review by Tomlin.

Review of Silverfish Bullet Microphones and sound samples

Jakub Svoboda, harmonica player in the Czech blues garage band “The Weathermakers”
(Ceramic Silverfish Bullet Mic)
Jakub uses a Silverfish microphone and recons the mic’s taken his playing to “another level”! Check out Jakub’s video review and sound sample of the silverfish harmonica bullet microphone

Silverfish Ceramic Harmonica - Bullet Microphone Review

Silverfish Ceramic Harmonica – Bullet Microphone Review

 

Q: What is impedance matching?

A: Please see: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan03/articles/impedanceworkshop.asp

 

Q: How can I sort impedance miss-match?

A: One common solution to sorting a miss-match of impedance related to high  Z (impedance outputs) and low Z amps is a impedance transformer plug. For example a Hosa MIT-129 Professional Microphone Impedance Transformer 1/4″ (6.3mm) in Female to XLRM Plug. This plug is designed to match 50K output impedance (broadly matching the high impedance of the Silverfish Mic III) to 200R input impedance. It is ideal for connecting a hi-Z instrument or mic to a microphone socket.

Hosa MIT-129 Impedance Transformer 1/4" in female to XLRM

Hosa MIT-129 Impedance Transformer 1/4″ in female to XLRM

 

Q: How to get the best out of your Silverfish ceramic harmonica microphone

A: The microphone is unbalanced and high impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as “passive”.

Poorly matched impedance may diminish the volume and performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amp or impedance converter as it is important to drive equipment with a source microphone signal that is lower in impedance than the destination amp’s input impedance (e.g. an amp input impedance of at least 10 times the amount of the source mic impedance).

Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from fluorescent lights and some electrical equipment. If this happens increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead.

To get the best out of your Silverfish dynamic harmonica microphone

The microphone is unbalanced and low/medium impedance. The mic therefore needs to be matched to a medium/high impedance socket on your amplifier; normally labelled as passive.

Poorly matched impedance may diminish the volume and performance of the mic and therefore require a pre-amp or impedance converter as it is important to drive equipment with a source microphone signal that is lower in impedance than the destination amp’s input impedance (e.g. an amp input impedance of at least 10 times the amount of the source mic impedance).

Unbalanced microphones can pick up interference (buzz/hum) from some electrical equipment. If this happens increase distance or turn off source of interference. Use a good quality (shielded) lead – such as an electric guitar lead – and avoid excessively long leads (>6m) especially when used in noisy (fluorescent lights, TV and radio transmissions) environments.

Please note

Using a right angle jack plug for the harmonica mic is a great idea and works well with the rig.

Your mic is a precision item of equipment so avoid dropping and use the protective case.

Please do not attempt to disassemble/ open the microphone. This will damage the components and negate your warranty.

Q: Maintaining the Silverfish Bullets: Poker-chip
A: To maintain the shine of the exposed metal parts of the poker-chip by periodically wiping the outer edge and inner rim (sparingly) with mineral or cooking oil – especially before prolonged storage or after extended use.

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